Top 5 Myths for Non-Profits and Associations Engaged in Social Networking: Redux

27Jun09

Fiesty Lynn here.

My last post was a little negative, scared this one will be too, but when I read this post from ThePort Social Media Solutions blog it struck me how self-serving the blog post ended up being. I think the idea base is good, but i’d like to strip out some things. I’ll probably get a bunch of heat for this post but here’s my go… let me know what you think!

5. Social Media isn’t Media

I think media is more than just a standard definition that relates to adevertising. It is a way that people communicate with their own content, it is a media of, for & by the people as opposed to large networks of professionals. You now find media professionals engaging in this new form, but they now need to play by the rules of the community, instead of setting their own.

4. If you build it, they will come

No they won’t. They’ll wonder why you spent the money on a large social network that nobody uses. Investing in a social network MUST be a call from the community. Experimentation though through free tools like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. IS A GOOD THING! You have to test b/c nobody knows everything about social media and each group of people. We are all learning. The risk I think is less when you’re talking about outposting, b/c you are going to them. The main investment is in staff time, but there are ways to cut that down.

3. IT Security Risks Are Not Common in Administrating a Social Community (I don’t believe this one fully, but I’m not an IT professional)

So I’ve been doing social media officially for an .org for 6 months now, but have been involved with social media for 5+ years and actively engaged on the web in primitive forms of collaboration since I was like 13. I’ve never had a problem with “IT Security Risks” before. If you’re smart and look at what you open, pay attention to what you download and use a decent anti-virus software (I use the free version of avast! & love it) you shouldn’t have an IT problem. The ONLY problem I’ve ever had is that since I installed Adobe Air on my work PC, it was having problems downloading Microsoft XP Service Pack 3 and the computer wouldn’t load on rare occassions, know how I solved this? I use a Mac now and am much happier for it, now to just get a Mac at home…

I will say you should be careful about the personal information that you put out there. Remember, people can see what you put out there, so if it can be used against you… don’t post it.

2. As Always, Quality Social Relationships Are Built More Offline than Online

I think I might come at this differently b/c I’ve met many people online during my web travels that ended up turning into quality offline relationships, though the bulk of the relationship was built online. I don’t think online relationships can last unless that’s all they have to go off of, but the natural way of people is to want to connect face to face, so if you establish an online relationship, I think the natural way is to be able to connect face to face.

1. Social Media Won’t Last

I don’t think the tools will last, but the way of engagement will. Social Media is revolutionizing how individuals digest content, online components have brought down an industry that thought it was invincible. These things are not going away, but they will evolve. How long will Twitter & Facebook last? Who knows, but in all likelihood they will be replaced by some shiny new toy. Though I think the important parts of engagement, instant communication and value sharing will not go away.

So I realize the beginning of this post was ragging on ThePort a bit, but their text just seemed really biased to me. Am I crazy for thinking this? I mean they ARE a white -label social network software providor, but did it have to be so blatant? To me it came off as though it was trying to “make a case” for a white-label network. Hope

ThePort doesn’t take offense for this post, just felt the need to respond.

~Lynn

IT Security Risks Are Not Common in  Administrating a Social Community
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2 Responses to “Top 5 Myths for Non-Profits and Associations Engaged in Social Networking: Redux”

  1. 1 ccematson

    Thanks for that Chris Brogan link. Helpful.


  1. 1 Associations Social Media Opportunity

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